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Eddington Number
 tojesky member offline
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posted 5/25/2015
at 9:21:35 AM
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What is your Eddington number? See description below taken from a Veloviewer link.

"Some may think Sir Arthur Eddington’s biggest contribution to the world was his work on Einstein’s Theory of Relativity, but for me the bigger impact came from his love of cycling. He devised a measure of a cyclist’s long distance riding achievements. Your Eddington number is defined as the largest integer E, where you have cycled at least E miles on at least E days. For example an E of 60 means that you have ridden 60 miles or more on 60 or more days. Simple."

triathlete-europe.competitor.com/2011/04/18/measuring-bike-miles-eddington-number

thread edited on 7/1/2018 at 7:51:45 AM

 Krypto member offline
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posted 5/25/2015
at 3:03:00 PM
post #1 viewed 5380 times
So this is a yr thing? So I could go back to the mid 2000s where I rode a lot, and pick my best yr and look in my journal to find my highest E number?
And that would be my E number then and now?

So every yr I'd have a different E number I suppose....or not. A little complicated but I'm going to see what I have.



I'm probably making it sound more complicated than it really is huh
post edited on 5/25/2015 at 2:44:39 PM

 tojesky member offline
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posted 5/25/2015
at 5:17:18 PM
post #2 viewed 5364 times
So this is a yr thing? So I could go back to the mid 2000s where I rode a lot, and pick my best yr and look in my journal to find my highest E number?
And that would be my E number then and now?

So every yr I'd have a different E number I suppose....or not. A little complicated but I'm going to see what I have.



I'm probably making it sound more complicated than it really is huh
-- posted by Krypto
It is based on the total historical representation of your riding history - that makes the most sense. I know mine is but my riding history and log is only 12 years and the metric pluses that I've ridden have mostly been in the last 5 years or so. So mine says that I have 65 rides of 65 miles or greater in my log.

Those that ride a lot and do a lot of centuries will have higher Eddington numbers. Interesting that someone that has 99 centuries but the next longest ride is 50 miles will have an Eddington number of 50! ***EDIT*** It's been pointed out that this would be an E number of 99. After rereading the article, I'm inclined to agree. Getting a large Eddington number takes a lot of really long rides.

Since my log is in a spreadsheet, I copied the ride distance to a separate worksheet and sorted those distances from high to low. I added a column with sequential numbers for each ride distance. I then found the row number that equaled the interger portion of the distance.

I then investigated what it would take to get to a higher number.

Eddington #....Rides needed of length or longer
......66.............2
......67............14
......68............25
......69............33
......70............36
post edited on 5/26/2015 at 2:56:59 PM

 Zurichman member not displaying online status
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posted 5/25/2015
at 8:58:03 PM
post #3 viewed 5339 times
So are you saying it's cumulative 50+ mile rides for as long as you have been riding or in your case you are counting 65+ mile rides?

Zman
post edited on 5/25/2015 at 9:40:19 PM

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posted 5/25/2015
at 9:59:29 PM
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So I did mine on 50 miles+

2003 2
2004 my big year as I did the entire rand SIR series + a 1200k
2004 44
2005 26
2006 25
2007 17
2008 diagnose with Prostate Cancer early spring only major ride of the year was the Assault on Mt. MitchelL
2008 6
2009 no rides
2010 no rides pretty much took me 2 years to get my energy back from the cancer
2011 only 2 rides total no 50's
2012 10
2013 umbilical hernia surgery
2013 2
2014 24
2015 17 so far

So since 2003 I have 175 rides of 50 miles or farther.

Zman
post edited on 5/25/2015 at 9:40:46 PM

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posted 5/25/2015
at 10:12:34 PM
post #5 viewed 5330 times
Zman, it's a little more complicated. It has nothing to do with a specific distance. Here's an example, and I hope I don't lose you with this Pansy math...

Say over the course of your life you have ridden the following:
30 centuries
25 rides of exactly 90 miles each
15 rides of exactly 70 miles each

That's a total of 70 rides (30 + 25 + 15) of at least 70 miles. So your Eddington number is 70 in this example. Here's the kicker... if you then go out and ride another century, your Eddington number doesn't change. That's because all those 70 mile rides don't count towards a higher Eddington. How many 71 mile rides do you have in this example? You've got the 30 centuries plus the 25 rides at 90 miles, that's only 55 rides of at least 71 miles. So to get your Eddington number up to 71, you'd have to do at least 16 more rides of 71 miles or more.

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posted 5/25/2015
at 10:13:20 PM
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This was a fun lookup. I kept tweaking the journal filter until I zeroed in on it. I have a lifetime Eddington number of 80. I have a century scheduled in two weeks that will bump it to 81. It will take three more big rides after that to bump it to 82, something I think I can do before the year is over. Thanks tojesky, yet another measurement to play with. I like it.

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posted 5/26/2015
at 3:15:35 AM
post #7 viewed 5320 times
Thanks for the exercise in journal filtering tojesky. My Nedd(cycling) is a measly 38.

Actually the exercise fits in with Eddington's legacy. His most renown contribution to astrophysics was his measurements of the stellar deflections during the 1919 solar eclipse, which offered the first confirmation of Einstein's theory of general relativity. He also attempted a purely numerological estimation of the number of protons in the universe - the Eddington number. He based this estimation on the fine constant which at the time was measured to be roughly 1/136. He argued that it should be exactly 1/136 and then calculated the Eddington number to be 10^80. Later when the fine constant measurements showed the value to be roughly 1/137, he changed his argument to say the fine constant should be exactly 1/137. This arbitrary change was met with a lot of derision from the physics community and he became known as "Arthur Addingone". So to increase your cycling Eddington number by one you have to "Addingone" ride of one more mile.

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posted 5/26/2015
at 6:20:38 AM
post #8 viewed 5307 times
I narrowed mine down pretty quickly. I knew I'd hit "a century of centuries" about a year and a half ago (although that includes a few from before I joined bikejournal), so I checked 100 first, and had 121 of them. My "default" century route is 102 miles, so I checked that next, and had 103. That meant my Eddington number couldn't possibly be more than 103, and I found I only have 83 of those. So, 102. Very interesting!
post edited on 5/26/2015 at 6:03:42 AM

 tojesky member offline
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posted 5/26/2015
at 8:20:43 AM
post #9 viewed 5291 times
Zman, it's a little more complicated. It has nothing to do with a specific distance. Here's an example, and I hope I don't lose you with this Pansy math...

Say over the course of your life you have ridden the following:
30 centuries
25 rides of exactly 90 miles each
15 rides of exactly 70 miles each

That's a total of 70 rides (30 + 25 + 15) of at least 70 miles. So your Eddington number is 70 in this example. Here's the kicker... if you then go out and ride another century, your Eddington number doesn't change. That's because all those 70 mile rides don't count towards a higher Eddington. How many 71 mile rides do you have in this example? You've got the 30 centuries plus the 25 rides at 90 miles, that's only 55 rides of at least 71 miles. So to get your Eddington number up to 71, you'd have to do at least 16 more rides of 71 miles or more.
-- posted by SafariCat
That is a good example Safaricat. And the nuance to get to the next level is what makes this a challenge. Like my example, to get to 70 from 65 is going to take me 35 rides of 70+ to get there!

This is fun. I'm going to compile responses and post in the first post.

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posted 5/26/2015
at 9:34:48 AM
post #10 viewed 5280 times
I had never heard of the Eddington Number before but will warm up Excel and figure out what mine is. Thank you for the post!
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